The Latest

Traverse Fifty portrait number 7 Bethan Marlow by Roslyn Gaunt. 
Bethan on the process- “I had a really lovely time. It was great to meet up with Roslyn and talk about what we both wanted from this process and for me to talk a bit about why I write and how I work. We then decided to do a studio shoot and play with make-up and what real and what’s fake, playing with both sides of reality and also toying with the whole question of ‘what is beauty?’ and how do we see ourselves and how do other people see us. I had such a great day and Roslyn was fab. Roslyn actually ended up using a photo she took on our first meet and I completely trust that it was the one that suited the collection the most. Really glad I had the opportunity to do it.”
Apr 8, 2014

Traverse Fifty portrait number 7 Bethan Marlow by Roslyn Gaunt.

Bethan on the process- “I had a really lovely time. It was great to meet up with Roslyn and talk about what we both wanted from this process and for me to talk a bit about why I write and how I work. We then decided to do a studio shoot and play with make-up and what real and what’s fake, playing with both sides of reality and also toying with the whole question of ‘what is beauty?’ and how do we see ourselves and how do other people see us. I had such a great day and Roslyn was fab. Roslyn actually ended up using a photo she took on our first meet and I completely trust that it was the one that suited the collection the most. Really glad I had the opportunity to do it.”

traversetheatre fifty portrait number 13 Denise Keane by Daniel D Moses @danieldmoses
Apr 7, 2014 / 2 notes

traversetheatre fifty portrait number 13 Denise Keane by Daniel D Moses @danieldmoses

Traverse Fifty portrait number 4…. Grace Clearly by Malcolm Irving

"I would like to comment on the very positive experience I had being photographed by Malcolm Irving, a Scotsman photographer.  Malcolm went out of his way to pursue the possibility of finding a venue for the photograph which matched the play I was writing.  After some exploration the only location that we could come up with was in Perth. 
I suggested that my home might be the best alternative as it was pretty personal and unusual.  Martin agreed and produced the only photograph I have ever liked in all the years I have been photographed.  Malcolm made me feel relaxed and coped easily with my reluctance.  He is a lovely guy and I wish him every success with his future ventures.”
Apr 6, 2014
Traverse Fifty portrait number 4…. Grace Clearly by Malcolm Irving
"I would like to comment on the very positive experience I had being photographed by Malcolm Irving, a Scotsman photographer.  Malcolm went out of his way to pursue the possibility of finding a venue for the photograph which matched the play I was writing.  After some exploration the only location that we could come up with was in Perth. 
I suggested that my home might be the best alternative as it was pretty personal and unusual.  Martin agreed and produced the only photograph I have ever liked in all the years I have been photographed.  Malcolm made me feel relaxed and coped easily with my reluctance.  He is a lovely guy and I wish him every success with his future ventures.”
traversetheatre fifty portrait number 12 Dave Fargnoli @davefargnoli
 by photographer Julie Layton
Apr 5, 2014

traversetheatre fifty portrait number 12 Dave Fargnoli @davefargnoli

 by photographer Julie Layton

Traverse Fifty portrait number 5… Todays portrait is Deborah Klayman by Alan Gignoux, taken as part of the Traverse fifty project. 
Deborah on the process…. “My portrait is one of a series shot by my wonderful photographer Alan Gignoux at Photofusion in Brixton, London. After reading my play The Boundary, Alan suggested we use the concept of boundaries and borders in the photos, which was an idea I really loved and which felt captured my Traverse journey. Alan asked me to draw boxes, lines and text around myself with light, and we experimented with this until he had several fantastic photos for me to choose from. It was hard to select just one, but this felt right as social justice is at the heart of my writing and we liked the composition – that the word was more prominent than the writer.”

About the traverse 50… The project, an experiment in collaboration between two mediums organised by Writer Pictures, paired 50 writers with fifty photographers to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh.  The rest of the images will be posted here over the coming weeks
Apr 4, 2014

Traverse Fifty portrait number 5… Todays portrait is Deborah Klayman by Alan Gignoux, taken as part of the Traverse fifty project. 

Deborah on the process…. “My portrait is one of a series shot by my wonderful photographer Alan Gignoux at Photofusion in Brixton, London. After reading my play The Boundary, Alan suggested we use the concept of boundaries and borders in the photos, which was an idea I really loved and which felt captured my Traverse journey. Alan asked me to draw boxes, lines and text around myself with light, and we experimented with this until he had several fantastic photos for me to choose from. It was hard to select just one, but this felt right as social justice is at the heart of my writing and we liked the composition – that the word was more prominent than the writer.”

About the traverse 50… The project, an experiment in collaboration between two mediums organised by Writer Pictures, paired 50 writers with fifty photographers to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh.  The rest of the images will be posted here over the coming weeks

Traverse fifty portrait number 3… Alison Carr by Ian Forsyth
Alison on the process “At first I was … what’s the word? … unimpressed by the prospect of the Trav50/Writers Pictures portraits as I hate getting my photo taken. Hate. It. Ian Forsyth drew the short straw and we took a stroll along the Quayside to get the photo. It was a glorious day so at least Newcastle was looking good, even if I wasn’t. It’s safe to say I am not a natural model. Ian, though, was great. He didn’t made a big deal of anything, it was all very relaxed and felt more like a stroll in the sun and a chat than it did a Big Scary Photo Shoot. And there are worse ways to spend an afternoon than that.”
Apr 3, 2014

Traverse fifty portrait number 3… Alison Carr by Ian Forsyth

Alison on the process “At first I was … what’s the word? … unimpressed by the prospect of the Trav50/Writers Pictures portraits as I hate getting my photo taken. Hate. It. 

Ian Forsyth drew the short straw and we took a stroll along the Quayside to get the photo. It was a glorious day so at least Newcastle was looking good, even if I wasn’t. 

It’s safe to say I am not a natural model. Ian, though, was great. He didn’t made a big deal of anything, it was all very relaxed and felt more like a stroll in the sun and a chat than it did a Big Scary Photo Shoot. And there are worse ways to spend an afternoon than that.”

robertormerod:

Grangemouth Oil Refinery for the New York Times
http://www.robertormerod.co.uk/commissions/grangemouth-petrochemicals-for-the-new-york-times/
Apr 3, 2014 / 2 notes
Traverse Fifty portrait number 2… Todays portrait is Frances Poet by Daniel Lema, taken as part of the Traverse fifty project. 
Frances on the process…. “I met Daniel for the third time at a studio at his college. I had my seven month old baby in tow. Daniel immediately noticed the brightly coloured caterpillar I had brought to entertain my daughter and how it contrasted with my dress so photographed me holding it like a handbag. Elizabeth was not enjoying sharing the attention and was protesting loudly. She was too distracting to allow us to do much but then we landed on the idea of me literally “juggling” the writing with the baby paraphernalia. Trying to get the shot and throwing the objects up at the right time was a dynamic enough challenge to distract us both from Elizabeth’s complaining. Her presence definitely influenced the energy and exasperation in the image. Thank heavens for a patient photographer.”     

About the traverse 50… The project, an experiment in collaboration between two mediums organised by Writer Pictures, paired 50 writers with fifty photographers to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh.  The rest of the images will be posted here over the coming weeks
Apr 2, 2014

Traverse Fifty portrait number 2… Todays portrait is Frances Poet by Daniel Lema, taken as part of the Traverse fifty project. 

Frances on the process…. “I met Daniel for the third time at a studio at his college. I had my seven month old baby in tow. Daniel immediately noticed the brightly coloured caterpillar I had brought to entertain my daughter and how it contrasted with my dress so photographed me holding it like a handbag. Elizabeth was not enjoying sharing the attention and was protesting loudly. She was too distracting to allow us to do much but then we landed on the idea of me literally “juggling” the writing with the baby paraphernalia. Trying to get the shot and throwing the objects up at the right time was a dynamic enough challenge to distract us both from Elizabeth’s complaining. Her presence definitely influenced the energy and exasperation in the image. Thank heavens for a patient photographer.”     

About the traverse 50… The project, an experiment in collaboration between two mediums organised by Writer Pictures, paired 50 writers with fifty photographers to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh.  The rest of the images will be posted here over the coming weeks

Todays Traverse Fifty portrait Drew Taylor by Blazej Marczak
Apr 1, 2014 / 1 note

Todays Traverse Fifty portrait Drew Taylor by Blazej Marczak

Traverse Fifty portrait number 1… AJ (Julia) Taudevin by Alicia Bruce… 

AJ Taudevin on the process “In June this year my play Some Other Mother toured Scotland. It is a play that was inspired by my work with communities of women and children living in Glasgow in the asylum system and the photography of my late brother Robin Taudevin who documented people in similar situations throughout the world.
The final performance of the tour was on Mull and so I decided to drive there as a surprise. I’m also a swimmer, so in the afternoon before the show I headed for one of the more beautiful and uninhabited parts of the island. After a 3 hour walk away from the road to the shore, I came to a small rock face on the other side of which I was sure lay the perfect spot to swim in.
Just when I thought I was being a bit more reckless than usual by climbing this way, I fell, dislocating my elbow. I stood up and tried tucking my fingers into the elbow joint to push it back into place. I remember the terrifying realisation that I’d only seen one person in the past three hours before fainting and falling several feet to the rocks rising up out of the incoming tide.
Fortunately the only damage was my arm which was well and truly banjaxed now and I began shouting for help. Perhaps forty minutes later, a large, hairy Australian appeared over the rocks. I hissed at him to get the f*** away from my arm and call a f***ing ambulance. Thank you hairy Australian, wherever you are now, for your patience and obedience! When at last I was wheeled into A&E it was five minutes to the half but there was no chance I was getting to see the show that night and try as I did to get the nurses to go and see it, they had a full evening ahead of them of a very different kind of theatre. The ordeal finished eight hours after I first fell.
Alicia and I had been trying for months to find the time to work together on the portrait, so we pushed ahead with our planned date for the photoshoot as I was leaving for London the following week to start rehearsing Chalk Farm.
I remember it being a beautiful evening on Arthur’s Seat. I grew up in Indonesia, the ‘Ring of Fire’ as it is known, and I always feel at home beneath Edinburgh’s giant volcano husk. We walked through the tall grass on the south side of the seat, willing the clouds to lift and the birds to stay hovering perfectly in shot. Alicia has an incredible talent for lending the environment of her photographs the textures of an oil painting and it feels appropriate for my love of surreality that that soft and classical landscape should be punctured by my disjointed angles and contorted features as I struggle to do up the buttons on the back of my blouse, entirely oblivious to Alicia mischievously capturing the moment only three feet away from me.”
AJ (Julia) Taudevin, 2013
Mar 31, 2014 / 2 notes

Traverse Fifty portrait number 1… AJ (Julia) Taudevin by Alicia Bruce… 

AJ Taudevin on the process “In June this year my play Some Other Mother toured Scotland. It is a play that was inspired by my work with communities of women and children living in Glasgow in the asylum system and the photography of my late brother Robin Taudevin who documented people in similar situations throughout the world.

The final performance of the tour was on Mull and so I decided to drive there as a surprise. I’m also a swimmer, so in the afternoon before the show I headed for one of the more beautiful and uninhabited parts of the island. After a 3 hour walk away from the road to the shore, I came to a small rock face on the other side of which I was sure lay the perfect spot to swim in.

Just when I thought I was being a bit more reckless than usual by climbing this way, I fell, dislocating my elbow. I stood up and tried tucking my fingers into the elbow joint to push it back into place. I remember the terrifying realisation that I’d only seen one person in the past three hours before fainting and falling several feet to the rocks rising up out of the incoming tide.

Fortunately the only damage was my arm which was well and truly banjaxed now and I began shouting for help. Perhaps forty minutes later, a large, hairy Australian appeared over the rocks. I hissed at him to get the f*** away from my arm and call a f***ing ambulance. Thank you hairy Australian, wherever you are now, for your patience and obedience! When at last I was wheeled into A&E it was five minutes to the half but there was no chance I was getting to see the show that night and try as I did to get the nurses to go and see it, they had a full evening ahead of them of a very different kind of theatre. The ordeal finished eight hours after I first fell.

Alicia and I had been trying for months to find the time to work together on the portrait, so we pushed ahead with our planned date for the photoshoot as I was leaving for London the following week to start rehearsing Chalk Farm.

I remember it being a beautiful evening on Arthur’s Seat. I grew up in Indonesia, the ‘Ring of Fire’ as it is known, and I always feel at home beneath Edinburgh’s giant volcano husk. We walked through the tall grass on the south side of the seat, willing the clouds to lift and the birds to stay hovering perfectly in shot. Alicia has an incredible talent for lending the environment of her photographs the textures of an oil painting and it feels appropriate for my love of surreality that that soft and classical landscape should be punctured by my disjointed angles and contorted features as I struggle to do up the buttons on the back of my blouse, entirely oblivious to Alicia mischievously capturing the moment only three feet away from me.”

AJ (Julia) Taudevin, 2013